Beaufort Books

youngadultatbooktopia:

If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.
– Haruki Murakami

thaurantiell:

Some beautiful reading nooks.

(Source: tea-books-lover, via literaryescapist)


by roncatti:
Librería Eterna Cadencia - Buenos Aires - Argentina - 2014

by roncatti:

Librería Eterna Cadencia - Buenos Aires - Argentina - 2014

(via teacoffeebooks)

bookwormscloset:

Spot the cat 

bookwormscloset:

Spot the cat 

(via abooksandcoffeelove)

Ursula K. Le Guin talks to Michael Cunningham about genres, gender, and broadening fiction | Electric Literature

"Our minds can learn a lot about the world by playing with it, and the imagination finds an infinite playing field in fiction." - Wise words from Ursula Le Guin about the value of science fiction and other "genre" fiction

3. The hazy, veiled nature of the real world after finishing an absorbing book
goth-girl-probs:

THIS STRUGGLE

goth-girl-probs:

THIS STRUGGLE

(via bibliophilefiles)

La caverne aux livres.

La caverne aux livres is a secondhand bookshop in Auvers-sur-Oise (30km to the North of Paris). The entrance of the bookshop is an ancient railway hangar, but from there you’ll quickly find yourself in an old postal train whose cars have been reconverted into giant bookshelves.

Text and photographs by Alexandre Duret-Lutz

(Source: bookporn, via lauriehalseanderson)

“The dialogue novel is often deeply intellectual. Recalling the conversations of Socrates and Plato, it allows for freewheeling philosophical inquiry. The lack of solidified characters and settings engenders abstraction, an open space where jokes, digressions, and ideas can roam wild. Diderot’s Jacques the Fatalist and his Master, first published in France in 1796, tells of chummy Jacques and his humdrum master. To pass the time on their journey, Jacques regales his master with tales of love and loss. Regardless of what happens—whether it’s tragic, banal, absurd, or romantic—Jacques claims it was written up above, meaning everything is predetermined, meaning that the course of our lives was set before we ever got here, which raises questions about the deterministic nature of existence, among other things.”

—   Seeing as the latest Dave Eggers book consists of all dialogue, it’s a good time to look back on the history of all-dialogue novels. Alexander Kalamaroff, writing for The Rumpusidentifies a few examples, among them The Waves by Virginia Woolf and numerous works in Sixty Stories by Donald Barthelme. (via millionsmillions)
littledallilasbookshelf:

Book, rain & tea……

littledallilasbookshelf:

Book, rain & tea……

(via literaryescapist)