Beaufort Books

“The dialogue novel is often deeply intellectual. Recalling the conversations of Socrates and Plato, it allows for freewheeling philosophical inquiry. The lack of solidified characters and settings engenders abstraction, an open space where jokes, digressions, and ideas can roam wild. Diderot’s Jacques the Fatalist and his Master, first published in France in 1796, tells of chummy Jacques and his humdrum master. To pass the time on their journey, Jacques regales his master with tales of love and loss. Regardless of what happens—whether it’s tragic, banal, absurd, or romantic—Jacques claims it was written up above, meaning everything is predetermined, meaning that the course of our lives was set before we ever got here, which raises questions about the deterministic nature of existence, among other things.”

—   Seeing as the latest Dave Eggers book consists of all dialogue, it’s a good time to look back on the history of all-dialogue novels. Alexander Kalamaroff, writing for The Rumpusidentifies a few examples, among them The Waves by Virginia Woolf and numerous works in Sixty Stories by Donald Barthelme. (via millionsmillions)
littledallilasbookshelf:

Book, rain & tea……

littledallilasbookshelf:

Book, rain & tea……

(via literaryescapist)

whimsybookowl:

Always <3

whimsybookowl:

Always <3

“A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.”

…Literature is my Utopia. Here I am not disenfranchised. No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourses of my book friends. They talk to me without embarrassment or awkwardness.

—   Helen Keller, The Story of My Life (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

figmentdotcom:

Who hasn’t imagined one of these?

figmentdotcom:

Who hasn’t imagined one of these?

“As a writer, if someone falls in love with my work, I know they have fallen in love with my mind. Having no idea what my face looks like, they chose my mind. Art may be the only space a woman can be whole without being seen.”

—   Nayyirah Waheed  (via ablogwithaview)

(Source: nayyirahwaheed, via openbookstore)

Ah, that moment where you are about to pick your next book.

bookaddict24-7:

image

(via bibliophilefiles)

“People who say they don’t have time to read simply don’t want to.”

—   Julie Rugg, A Book Addict’s Treasury (via taylorbooks)

Carry the book you’re writing in your imagination, but keep your mouth closed. That way, nothing that belongs to the book will escape—no image will fade from overexposure, no dialogue will become rote, and no idea will lose its full impact.

Sealed in its original container—your head—your work will retain all its freshness and flavor.

“I’ve always found that the better the book I’m reading, the smarter I feel, or, at least, the more able I am to imagine that I might, someday, become smarter.”

—   Francine Prose, Reading Like a Writer: A Guide for People Who Love Books and for Those Who Want to Write Them (via taylorbooks)

Bookshelf porn by Queenie and the Dew
streetlightreader:

(by childrensillustrator)

“Generally speaking, books don’t cause much harm. Except when you read them, that is. Then they cause all kinds of problems.”

—   Pseudonymous Bosch (via observando)

(via teacoffeebooks)